Delegation of power in the Nazi government

Adolf Hitler and his Cabinet, 1933

Adolft Hitler and his Cabinet, January 1933

The Führer in theory has unlimited power, filtering down to the Reich cabinet and state governors overseeing all decision making, with party and state working together. The debate among historians is whether the Nazi regime was an authoritarian or polycratic state, or something in between characterizing a confused polycratic state made of overlapping bodies. During Hitler’s time in government he dismisses the clarity of leadership within the Third Reich and creates overlapping positions. It can be argued that Hitler’s weak leadership created a chaotic form of bureaucracy.  (Daivd Williamson, Mary Fulbrook, Nick Fellow, and Mike Wells, Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany 1919-1963 (Oxford: Heinemann, 2008), 19.)

The appointment of cabinet positions to loyal supporters of the Führer and delegating power among many chancellors with overlapping responsibilities is perceived to be a characteristic of a weak and disorganized dictatorship style. However Hitler delegates’ power among military positions to strengthen his position as Führer, Hitler aims to transfer the jurisdiction traditionally bestowed among military commanders on the home front to the Nazi party (Noakes, 76.) Considering the extreme loyalty evident among the Nazi Party installing loyalists into high ranking cabinet positions strengthens Hitler’s leadership and expands his power.

Delegation of power in the Nazi government